Government

French investigate Woolwich ‘copy-cat’ attack on terrorism patrol soldier in Paris

French investigate Woolwich ‘copy-cat’ attack on terrorism patrol soldier in Paris

The soldier was wounded in the incident which happened as he patrolled the French capital’s La Defense business district with two comrades.

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An attack on a French soldier in a busy underground railway station near Paris on Saturday might have been a spur-of-the-moment copy of London’s Woolwich killing, French investigators believe.#

France’s terrorism investigation unit was called in to lead the hunt for a man of Fren appearance who stabbed in the neck a soldier on anti-terrorist patrol amid thousands of Saturday shoppers.

The soldier was cut, possibly by a box-cutter, close to his carotid artery. He bled profusely but was not seriously injured. His wound needed only one stitch.

Officially, the French government is making no direct link with the killing of a British soldier by two Islamist radicals on a street in Woolwich last Wednesday. Unofficially, investigators are said to believe it was almost certainly a copy-cat attack, possibly carried out on the spur of the moment.

The French defence minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian,  who visited the injured man in hospital, said that it was clear that “someone wanted to kill him because he was a soldier”. The interior minister, Manuel Valls, said France would continue to wage an “implacable fight against terrorism”.

Cedric Cordier, 23, of the 4th cavalry regiment, was patrolling in battle-dress with a policeman and another soldier in the underground concourse of the RER (regional Metro) station at La Défense just west of Paris just before 6pm on Saturday. Anti-terrorist patrols of this kind have become a common sight in France since a  series of murderous bomb attacks on the Paris Metro in the mid-1990s.

The attacker came up behind the soldier, who was the last man in the patrol, and slashed or stabbed his neck with a blade.

The attacker, described as a muscular man in his earlier thirties and of North African appearance, fled into the adjoining shopping centre before the other members of the patrol could react. The area bristled with security cameras whose footage is being studied.

The so-called “Vigipirate” armed military patrols on busy streets and in metro and railways stations are supposed to deter terrorist attacks. They have often been criticised as more decorative than useful. If they become, themselves, an easy target for low-level terrorism, the French government may have to abandon them or revert to police-only patrols.

President François Hollande, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia,  for a conference on African unity, said: “We will examine all possibilities. I see no reason at this stage to make a link with what happened in London. But we must look into all possibilities, without exception.”

Woolwich attack: Armed officers arrest fifth man in connection with death of Lee Rigby

Woolwich attack: Armed officers arrest fifth man in connection with death of Lee Rigby

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A MAN was arrested today by counter-terrorism officers in connection with the death of Drummer Lee Rigby, Scotland Yard said.

Armed officers were involved in the arrest of the man, 22, on suspicion of conspiracy to murder, in St Paul’s Road in Highbury Grove, north London, the Metropolitan Police said.

He is the fifth man to be arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to murder Drummer Rigby, 25, in Woolwich, south east London, last Wednesday.

A Metropolitan Police spokesman said: “At 2.35pm today a 22-year-old man was arrested by officers from the MPS Counter-Terrorism Command investigating the murder of Lee Rigby.

“The man was arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to murder by detectives supported by specialist firearms officers.

“He has been taken to a south-London police station where he remains in custody.

“He was arrested in St Paul’s Road, in Highbury Grove, north London.”

The latest arrest came hours after members of the serviceman’s family visited the scene of his murder.

Woolwich terror attack: Grieving family of murdered soldier Lee Rigby overcome with emotion as they lay flowers at scene where he died

His widow Rebecca, mother Lyn, 46, and stepfather Ian, 54, laid flowers at the Woolwich Barracks where the soldier with the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers was based, and where hundreds of floral tributes have already been left by wellwishers.

Their visit came as Home Secretary Theresa May warned today there are potentially thousands of people at risk of being radicalised in the UK, as she indicated plans for a fresh crackdown on extremist groups.

Home Secretary Theresa May poised to bring back ‘snooper’s charter’ that will give authorities access to internet records

Nine people have now been arrested in connection with Drummer Rigby’s death.

Michael Adebolajo, 28, and Michael Oluwatobi Adebowale, 22, who are being held on suspicion of murder, remain in hospital.

Three men aged 28, 24 and 21 remain in police custody after being arrested yesterday on suspicion of conspiracy to commit murder.

A 29-year-old man arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to murder has been released on bail, police said last night.

New poll shows 63 per cent of people living in UK would support the death penalty for convicted terrorists

Two women aged 29 and 31 who were held on Thursday on suspicion of conspiracy to commit murder have been released without charge.

Kenyan anti-terrorism police today confirmed that Adebolajo had previously been arrested in the country close to the border with Somalia, where al Qaida-linked militant group al-Shabab is based.

Woolwich terror attack: Lee Rigby murder suspect was arrested in Kenya

Anti-terrorism unit head Boniface Mwaniki told the Associated Press he was arrested in 2010 along with five other men, all believed to have been preparing to train and fight with the group.

He said Adebolajo was later deported.

A Foreign Office spokeswoman confirmed that a British national was arrested in Kenya in 2010. “FCO provided consular assistance as normal for British nationals,” she said.

Kenya’s government spokesman later said Adebolajo,was arrested under a different name and taken to court before being handed to British authorities.

“Kenya’s government arrested Michael Olemindis Ndemolajo. We handed him to British security agents in Kenya and he seems to have found his way to London and mutated to Michael Adebolajo,” said spokesman Muthui Kariuki.

“The Kenyan government cannot be held responsible for what happened to him after we handed him to British authorities.”

Source : Daily Record

London: Man hacked to death with meat cleavers outside Woolwich army base. Terrorist?

London: Man hacked to death with meat cleavers outside Woolwich army base. Terrorist?

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A man has been hacked to death and possibly beheaded in a suspected terrorist attack outside a military base in south-east London.

Key Points

  • Cleaver murder victim believed to be soldier
  • Mobile phone footage shows attacker attempting to justify attack
  • Alleged attackers shot by police
  • Witness: “They were just animals.”
  • PM David Cameron cuts short France visit

 

Eyewitnesses say two men used a car to run the victim over in broad daylight on a street about 200 metres from the Royal Artillery Barracks in Woolwich.

The men then attacked him with knives and a gun and then remained at the scene, asking passers-by to photograph and film them.

Footage shows one of the men carrying a blood-covered knife and meat cleaver and saying to the camera: “We swear by almighty Allah we will never stop fighting you.”

Watch the ITV footage (warning: contains graphic images).

Armed police shot and wounded the two attackers after being called to the incident by bystanders.

There are reports the dead man was a serving soldier who was wearing a t-shirt with the logo of the Help for Heroes military charity.

Witnesses describe horror of ‘crazy’ attack

One eyewitness, identified only as James, told local radio station LBC the two assailants “were hacking at this poor guy”.

“We thought they were trying to remove organs or something.

“These two guys were crazy, they just were not there, they were just animals.”

In the footage of the aftermath of the attack, one of the attackers makes a number of political statements while the body of his victim lies in the road behind him.

Speaking in a London accent, the man, looking agitated and angry, said: “I apologise that women had to witness that, but in our lands our women have to see the same thing.

“You people will never be safe. Remove your government. They don’t care about you.”

“They were just animals,” one eyewitness said.

“They then dragged the poor guy, he was obviously dead. There was no way a human could take that, what they did to him.

“They dragged him from the pavement and dumped his body in the middle of the road.”

Eyewitness Michael Atley said there was blood all over the road.

“It’s a scene out of a horror movie, to be honest,” he said. “It’s incredible, absolutely incredible, never seen nothing like it.

“Just a bad day. A bad day for the whole of Britain.”

PM Cameron rushes back from Paris, security tightened

Security is being tightened at British military bases in the wake of the attack.

Prime minister David Cameron, who rushed back from Paris to chair an emergency national security meeting, said there were “strong indications” that the killing was “a terrorist incident.”

“The police are urgently seeking the full facts about this case but there are strong indications that it is a terrorist incident,” he said from Paris.

“People in every community, I believe, will utterly condemn this attack.

“We have had these sorts of attacks before in our country and we never buckle in the face of them.”

Home secretary Theresa May said in a statement: “This is a sickening and barbaric attack.”

London mayor Boris Johnson said security would be boosted at all London barracks.

“I know that Londoners have been through terrorism before and this city has a huge resilience,” he said.

“What we also have is the best, the most professional security services and the best police in the world to protect us and they are now going to get to the bottom of what’s happened.”

Police are on alert for disturbances across London, with reports that supporters of the far-right English Defence League had clashed with police in Woolwich.

Source : ABC.net
London Mayor announces £25m small business fund

London Mayor announces £25m small business fund

Regent+Street

London Mayor announces £25m small business fund

Tim DonovanBy Tim DonovanPolitical Editor, BBC London

Mayor of London Boris Johnson makes a Gu chocolate souffle with head chef Boris Johnson visited a Gu pudding maker’s factory in east London
London Mayor Boris Johnson plans to use £25m of government money to help small businesses access loans.

It forms part of proposals to invest the second tranche of a total £111m provided by the government to try to revive London’s economy.

Government ministers recently criticised the mayor’s slow progress in creating a “jobs and growth strategy”.

The mayor has so far spent only £2m of £70m available to his London Enterprise Panel in the first tranche.

Continue reading the main story

“Start Quote

It is vital that the scheme announced today is attached to the soon to be created Business Bank which will house a myriad of similar funds”

Steve WarwickFederation of Small Businesses

Mr Johnson was not clear on the details of how the £25m would be spent but said would be used to help small businesses.

“Today’s fund, which will enable significant support for small and medium businesses, is just one way we are working to unlock potential and provide jobs for our growing city,” Mr Johnson said Mr Johnson at a Gu pudding factory in Walthamstow.

‘Turned down’

His officials said the idea was to get a private financial institution to match the amount, creating a £50m fund to help provide loans and equity for small and medium-sized businesses.

Steve Warwick from the Federation of Small Businesses said it would be welcomed.

“The credit crunch has meant that many businesses have struggled to get the finance that they need to operate their business effectively,” he said.

“Our research shows that five in ten businesses in London were turned down for a loan or overdraft in the first quarter of 2013.

“This needs to be addressed as a matter of urgency which is why it is vital that the scheme announced today is attached to the soon to be created Business Bank which will house a myriad of similar funds.”

A further £15m is being made available for companies and research institutions in the science and technology sector who must apply for funding.

It has also emerged the mayor plans to spend £25m on widening the Western Anglia rail route, saying this will help the economy of east London by improving transport links.

Mr Johnson said it was “coincidental” the West Anglia rail franchise is one of the two he wants to take over next year.

Do you know your social media rights?

Do you know your social media rights?

UK.Gov passes Instagram Act: All your pics belong to everyone now

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Have you ever uploaded a photo to Facebook, Instagram or Flickr?

If so, you’ll probably want to read this, because the rules on who can exploit your work have now changed radically, overnight.

 Amateur and professional illustrators and photographers alike will find themselves ensnared by the changes, the result of lobbying by Silicon Valley and radical bureaucrats and academics. The changes are enacted in the sprawling Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act which received Royal Assent last week, and it marks a huge shift in power away from citizens and towards large US corporations.

How so? Previously, and in most of the world today, ownership of your creation is automatic, and legally considered to be an individual’s property. That’s enshrined in the Berne Convention and other international treaties, where it’s considered to be a basic human right. What this means in practice is that you can go after somebody who exploits it without your permission – even if pursuing them is cumbersome and expensive.

The UK coalition government’s new law reverses this human right. When last year Instagram attempted to do something similar, it met a furious backlash. But the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act has sailed through without most amateurs or semi-professionals even realising the consequences.

The Act contains changes to UK copyright law which permit the commercial exploitation of images where information identifying the owner is missing, so-called “orphan works”, by placing the work into what’s known as “extended collective licensing” schemes. Since most digital images on the internet today are orphans – the metadata is missing or has been stripped by a large organisation – millions of photographs and illustrations are swept into such schemes.

For the first time anywhere in the world, the Act will permit the widespread commercial exploitation of unidentified work – the user only needs to perform a “diligent search”. But since this is likely to come up with a blank, they can proceed with impunity. The Act states that a user of a work can act as if they are the owner of the work (which should be you) if they’re given permission to do so by the Secretary of State.

The Act also fails to prohibit sub-licensing, meaning that once somebody has your work, they can wholesale it. This gives the green light to a new content-scraping industry, an industry that doesn’t have to pay the originator a penny. Such is the consequence of “rebalancing copyright”, in reality.

What now?

Quite what happens next is not clear, because the Act is merely enabling legislation – the nitty gritty will come in the form of statutory instruments, to be tabled later in the year. Parliament has not voted down a statutory instrument since 1979, so the political process is probably now a formality.

In practice, you’ll have two stark choices to prevent being ripped off: remove your work from the internet entirely, or opt-out by registering it. And registration will be on a work-by-work basis.

“People can now use stuff without your permission,” explained photo rights campaigner Paul Ellis. “To stop that you have to register your work in a registry – but registering stuff is an activity that costs you time and money. So what was your property by default will only remain yours if you take active steps, and absorb the costs, if it is formally registered to you as the owner.”

And right now, Ellis says, there’s only one registry, PLUS. Photographers, including David Bailey, condemned the government for rushing through the legislation before other registries – such as the Copyright Hub – could sort themselves out.

“The mass of the public will never realise they’ve been robbed,” thinks Ellis. The radical free-our-information bureaucrats at the Intellectual Property Office had already attempted to smuggle orphan works rules through via the Digital Economy Act in 2010, but were rebuffed. Thanks to a Google-friendly Conservative-led administration, they’ve now triumphed.

Three other consequences appear possible.

One is a barrage of litigation from UK creators – and overseas owners who find their work Hoovered into extended collective licensing programs. International treaties allow a country to be ostracised and punished. The threat has already been made clear from US writers and photographers, who’ve promised “a firestorm“. Reciprocal royalty arrangements can also be suspended, on the basis of “if you steal our stuff, UK, we won’t pay you”. In addition, a judicial review, based on the premise that the Act gives Minister unconstitutional power over the disposal of private property, is not out of the question.

Secondly, the disappearance of useful material from the internet is likely to accelerate – the exact opposite of what supporters wish for. We recently highlighted the case of an aerial photographer who’s moving work outside the UK, and we’ve heard of several who are taking their photos away from the web, and into lockers. The internet is poorer without a diverse creative economy – because creators need legal certainty of property rights.

And finally, there’s the macroeconomic consequences for the UK economy.

The notorious ‘Google Review’ chaired by Ian Hargreaves failed to undertake adequate impact assessments, a giveaway that even the most rabid “copyright reformers” recognise there isn’t an economic case to be made for taking everyone’s stuff and giving it away.

“There’s value in works, and if anybody can exploit them except the person who creates them, then value is transferred to the exploiter,” explains Ellis. “This is a massive value transfer out of the UK economy to US tech companies.”

Where it will remain, he thinks, because UK tech/media companies – should they appear – almost invariably become US-owned.

Copyright “reformers” of course rarely like to talk about such unpleasant matters – and will steer the conversation away from economic consequences as rapidly as possible. Indeed, the they generally talk using Orwellian euphemisms – like “liberalising” or “rebalancing” copyright. It’s rarely presented as an individual’s ability to go to market being removed. This is what “copyright reform” looks like in practice.

“It’s corporate capitalism,” says Ellis. “Ideally you want to empower individuals to trade, and keep the proceeds of their trade. The UK has just lost that.”

So while the Twitterati and intelligentsia were ranting away about “Big Content”, we’ve just lost the ability to sell our own content. In other words, you’ve just been royally fucked.

Source : The Register

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