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Event : Be human this November 5th Feed And Clothe The Homeless

Event : Be human this November 5th Feed And Clothe The Homeless

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Wednesday, November 5 at 8:30pm
UK Parliament
Houses of Parliament, Westminster, SW1A 0AA London, United Kingdom

Meet at parliament square at 3:00pm
Make sure you bring food and clothes for our homeless people of London.
We will spend some time meeting and greeting before we walk up to Trafalgar Square to hand out the goods.

Dope Emcees will be in attendance so bring your freestyle game with you.

Vee Roc will be taking an acoustic guitar, anyone else wanting to please feel free. Bongo players welcome……. Let’s have some fun, let’s show the rest of the world how HIP HOP takes care of people

This can be so DOPE. Please do not bring any attitudes that are detrimental to the cause. This is not a protest, this will be peaceful

One Love

Vee

Facebook Page https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1507366359497316&id=100006718995498

London Fireworks 2014 – New Year’s Eve Fireworks – BBC One

London Fireworks 2014 – New Year’s Eve Fireworks – BBC One

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City of London calls halt to smartphone tracking bins

City of London calls halt to smartphone tracking bins

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The City of London Corporation has asked a company to stop using recycling bins to track the smartphones of passers-by.

Renew London had fitted devices into 12 “pods”, which feature LCD advertising screens, to collect footfall data by logging nearby phones.

Chief executive Kaveh Memari said the company had “stopped all trials in the meantime”.

The corporation has taken the issue to the Information Commissioner’s Office.

The action follows concerns raised by privacy campaign group Big Brother Watch, after details of the technology used in the bins emerged in the online magazine Quartz.

Mr Memari told the BBC that the devices had only recorded “extremely limited, encrypted, aggregated and anonymised data” and that the current technology was just being used to monitor local footfall, in a similar way as a web page monitors traffic.

He added that more capabilities could be developed in the future, but that the public would be made aware of any changes.

The bins, which are located in the Cheap side area of central London, log the media access control (MAC) address of individual smartphones – a unique identification code carried by all devices that can connect to a network.

A spokesman for the City of London Corporation said: “Irrespective of what’s technically possible, anything that happens like this on the streets needs to be done carefully, with the backing of an informed public.”

Legal ‘grey area’

Mr Memari insisted that the bins were just “glorified people-counters in the street” and that his company held no personal information about the smartphone owners.

While the collection of anonymous data through MAC addresses is legal in the UK, the practice has been described as a “grey area”.

The UK and the EU have strict laws about mining personal data using cookies, which involves effectively installing a small monitoring device on people’s phones or computers, but the process of tracking MAC codes leaves no trace on individuals’ handsets.

Websites or companies wanting to use cookies to tracks users’ habits have to ask for permission. By monitoring MAC addresses, which just keeps a log of each time a wi-fi enabled device connects to another device, they can work around this requirement.

Presence Orb, the company that provides the tracking technology to Renew London, calls its service “a cookie for the real world”.

‘Data and revenue’

Nick Pickles, director of Big Brother Watch, said: “I am pleased the City of London has called a halt to this scheme, but questions need to be asked about how such a blatant attack on people’s privacy was able to occur in the first place.

“Systems like this highlight how technology has made tracking us much easier, and in the rush to generate data and revenue there is not enough of a deterrent for people to stop and ensure that people are asked to give their consent before any data is collected.”

Reacting to the City of London Corporation’s call, an Information Commissioner’s Office spokesperson said: “Any technology that involves the processing of personal information must comply with the Data Protection Act.

“We are aware of the concerns being raised over the use of these bins and will be making inquiries to establish what action, if any, is required.”

By Joe Miller

BBC News

‘Ethnic majority’ areas growing, says report

‘Ethnic majority’ areas growing, says report

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David Barrett

By , Home Affairs Correspondent

The number of areas where black and Asian people make up the bulk of the population has grown significantly in the last decade, according to new research.

Demos, the Left-wing think-tank, said its analysis of Census data for England and Wales showed ethnic minorities are concentrating in particular areas and white people are moving out.

The findings echo a phenomenon first seen in the mid-20th century United States – where it was dubbed “white flight” – which saw racially-mixed urban areas become predominantly black as affluent whites moved to the suburbs.

The research is significant because Demos, which was once closely linked with the previous Labour government which increased immigration to record levels, suggested ethnic minorities are becoming more isolated in British life rather than becoming more integrated in a “multi-cultural” Britain.

It found 4.6 million ethnic minority Britons – about 45 per cent of the country’s black and Asian population – are now living in areas where whites are in a minority.

Ten years ago just one million black and Asian people, or 25 per cent of the country’s then total ethnic minority population, lived in such communities, said Demos.

In the 2001 Census, 282 of the 8,850 council wards in England and Wales were classed as “high non-white” or “highest non-white” by Demos, but in the 2011 Census that figure had risen to 414.

David Goodhart, director of Demos said: “This has uncovered a really quite shocking level of concentration of the ethnic minority population, which means there is less opportunity for interaction with the white mainstream.”

Demos’s research said in minority-dominated areas new waves of immigrants such as Somalis take up housing vacated by established minorities, such as Afro-Caribbeans.

“This means a dissipation of ethnic concentrations, but also an increase in the number of people who have limited contact with white British people,” it said.

The paper attributed the changes to white British people choosing not to move to minority-dominated areas.

Trevor Phillips, a former chairman of the Commission for Racial Equality and its successor, described it as “majority retreat”.

Mr Phillips, who is now a Demos associate, said: “This very interesting piece of research reveals a number of vital findings about how people in England and Wales are living together.

“What ought to make us a little anxious is the ‘majority retreat’ it has unearthed – white people leaving minority-led areas and not returning – which isn’t good news for the cause of integration.”

The research by Eric Kaufmann, professor of politics at Birkbeck College, London, also showed some ethnic minorities are spreading out more into white-dominated parts of the country.

Black and Asian people are becoming less rare in provincial England because there are now fewer than 800 council wards that are more than 98 per cent white compared with more than 5,000 in 2001.

Sir Andrew Green, Chairman of Migration Watch said the findings were a sign that Britain is becoming more segregated.

He said: “This is extremely serious. It is undeniable evidence that we have indeed been sleepwalking into segregation as Trevor Phillips warned seven years ago and it is the clear result of Labour’s mass immigration policy.

“Public dismay at the pace of change in our communities largely explains why so many voted as they did in last week’s local elections.

“The case for a sharp reduction in immigration is now overwhelming; we cannot possibly integrate new arrivals on anything like the present scale.”

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