BBC

When You Get Stopped By The Police | Man Like Mobeen

When You Get Stopped By The Police | Man Like Mobeen

All Mobeen wants to do is lead a good life, but his criminal past is always chasing him.

Jeremy Clarkson, Top Gear host, suspended by BBC after ‘fracas’

Jeremy Clarkson, Top Gear host, suspended by BBC after ‘fracas’

_81552962_81545582

Top Gear host Jeremy Clarkson has been suspended by the BBC “following a fracas” with a producer.

The corporation said the 54-year-old presenter had been suspended “pending an investigation”.

“No one else has been suspended. Top Gear will not be broadcast this Sunday,” it said.

Clarkson was given what he called his “final warning” last May after claims he used a racist word while filming the popular BBC motoring show.

At the time, he said the BBC had told him he would be sacked if he made “one more offensive remark, anywhere, at any time”.

The BBC gave no further details on the current incident involving Clarkson, and said it would not be making any further statements at this time.

Clarkson’s representatives have yet to reply to requests for a comment.

The presenter himself has remained silent, however last month he tweeted a post saying a “new presenter for Top Gear” was wanted.

“Applicant should be old, badly dressed and pedantic but capable of getting to work on time,” he said.

Top Gear

This weekend’s episode of Top Gear was set to feature Clarkson – who has fronted the show since 2002 – along with regular co-hosts Richard Hammond and James May at a classic track day.

Former footballer and pundit Gary Lineker was also to appear as the “star in a reasonably priced car”.

Lineker has now tweeted, writing: “I don’t think I’m ever meant to appear on Top Gear!”

‘Strong character’

Former Top Gear presenter Chris Goffey told BBC Radio 5 live while discussions on the programme sometimes became heated when he worked on the show, “it must have been something fairly serious behind the scenes to warrant his immediate suspension.

“I can’t think what the hell’s gone on, but there you go. When you’ve got a very strong character who likes things his own way, if somebody stands up to him, there’s going to be a row.”

Clarkson has courted controversy on several occasions during his time hosting Top Gear.

Jeremy Clarkson and Richard Hammond in the Top Gear Burma specialTop Gear was censured by Ofcom for using a “racial” term in its Burma special programme

The show’s executive producer, Andy Wilman, described last year as “an annus horribilis” for the programme.

It followed an incident in Argentina where the presenters and crew were forced to flee the country after trouble erupted over a number plate reading H982 FLK – which some suggested referred to the Falklands conflict of 1982.

Last year the show was also censured by Ofcom for breaching broadcasting rules after Clarkson used a derogatory word for Asian people during its Burma special programme.

TV critic Toby Earle told the BBC he was not surprised a Clarkson’s suspension. “This incident is the one that’s really forced management to take action,” he said.

“Part of the show’s appeal, to many viewers, has been it’s sort of edginess and the fact that it’s rough around the edges – in some ways takes no prisoners.

“But of course there is a very delicate line to tread with that, and it has crossed that line I feel.”

line

With Clarkson at its head, Top Gear has been no stranger to controversy.

  • October 2014 – The show’s stars and crew had to abandon filming in Argentina amid angry protests over a car number plate that appears to refer to the Falklands War.
  • July 2014 – Ofcom ruled that a Burma Special in which Jeremy Clarkson used a racial slur broke broadcasting rules. Clarkson had used the word “slope” as an Asian man crossed a newly built bridge over the River Kwai in Thailand.
  • May 2014 – The programme drew complaints when video footage leaked to the Daily Mirror appeared to show Jeremy Clarkson using a racist term while reciting the nursery rhyme Eeny, Meeny, Miny, Moe. The presenter later apologised for the incident – which was never broadcast – in a video statement where he “begged forgiveness”.
  • October 2012 – The BBC Trust ruled that comments by Clarkson which likened the design of a camper van to people with facial disfigurementsbreached disability guidelines.
  • January 2012 – Indian diplomats complained about a 90-minute India special in which a car fitted with a toilet in its boot is described by Clarkson as “perfect for India because everyone who comes here gets the trots.”
  • February 2011 – The BBC apologised to Mexico after Clarkson and his co-hosts characterised Mexicans as “lazy” and “feckless”.
London Fireworks 2014 – New Year’s Eve Fireworks – BBC One

London Fireworks 2014 – New Year’s Eve Fireworks – BBC One

SNN0109ALON--_1646382a

City of London calls halt to smartphone tracking bins

City of London calls halt to smartphone tracking bins

xl_renew

The City of London Corporation has asked a company to stop using recycling bins to track the smartphones of passers-by.

Renew London had fitted devices into 12 “pods”, which feature LCD advertising screens, to collect footfall data by logging nearby phones.

Chief executive Kaveh Memari said the company had “stopped all trials in the meantime”.

The corporation has taken the issue to the Information Commissioner’s Office.

The action follows concerns raised by privacy campaign group Big Brother Watch, after details of the technology used in the bins emerged in the online magazine Quartz.

Mr Memari told the BBC that the devices had only recorded “extremely limited, encrypted, aggregated and anonymised data” and that the current technology was just being used to monitor local footfall, in a similar way as a web page monitors traffic.

He added that more capabilities could be developed in the future, but that the public would be made aware of any changes.

The bins, which are located in the Cheap side area of central London, log the media access control (MAC) address of individual smartphones – a unique identification code carried by all devices that can connect to a network.

A spokesman for the City of London Corporation said: “Irrespective of what’s technically possible, anything that happens like this on the streets needs to be done carefully, with the backing of an informed public.”

Legal ‘grey area’

Mr Memari insisted that the bins were just “glorified people-counters in the street” and that his company held no personal information about the smartphone owners.

While the collection of anonymous data through MAC addresses is legal in the UK, the practice has been described as a “grey area”.

The UK and the EU have strict laws about mining personal data using cookies, which involves effectively installing a small monitoring device on people’s phones or computers, but the process of tracking MAC codes leaves no trace on individuals’ handsets.

Websites or companies wanting to use cookies to tracks users’ habits have to ask for permission. By monitoring MAC addresses, which just keeps a log of each time a wi-fi enabled device connects to another device, they can work around this requirement.

Presence Orb, the company that provides the tracking technology to Renew London, calls its service “a cookie for the real world”.

‘Data and revenue’

Nick Pickles, director of Big Brother Watch, said: “I am pleased the City of London has called a halt to this scheme, but questions need to be asked about how such a blatant attack on people’s privacy was able to occur in the first place.

“Systems like this highlight how technology has made tracking us much easier, and in the rush to generate data and revenue there is not enough of a deterrent for people to stop and ensure that people are asked to give their consent before any data is collected.”

Reacting to the City of London Corporation’s call, an Information Commissioner’s Office spokesperson said: “Any technology that involves the processing of personal information must comply with the Data Protection Act.

“We are aware of the concerns being raised over the use of these bins and will be making inquiries to establish what action, if any, is required.”

By Joe Miller

BBC News

London Mayor announces £25m small business fund

London Mayor announces £25m small business fund

Regent+Street

London Mayor announces £25m small business fund

Tim DonovanBy Tim DonovanPolitical Editor, BBC London

Mayor of London Boris Johnson makes a Gu chocolate souffle with head chef Boris Johnson visited a Gu pudding maker’s factory in east London
London Mayor Boris Johnson plans to use £25m of government money to help small businesses access loans.

It forms part of proposals to invest the second tranche of a total £111m provided by the government to try to revive London’s economy.

Government ministers recently criticised the mayor’s slow progress in creating a “jobs and growth strategy”.

The mayor has so far spent only £2m of £70m available to his London Enterprise Panel in the first tranche.

Continue reading the main story

“Start Quote

It is vital that the scheme announced today is attached to the soon to be created Business Bank which will house a myriad of similar funds”

Steve WarwickFederation of Small Businesses

Mr Johnson was not clear on the details of how the £25m would be spent but said would be used to help small businesses.

“Today’s fund, which will enable significant support for small and medium businesses, is just one way we are working to unlock potential and provide jobs for our growing city,” Mr Johnson said Mr Johnson at a Gu pudding factory in Walthamstow.

‘Turned down’

His officials said the idea was to get a private financial institution to match the amount, creating a £50m fund to help provide loans and equity for small and medium-sized businesses.

Steve Warwick from the Federation of Small Businesses said it would be welcomed.

“The credit crunch has meant that many businesses have struggled to get the finance that they need to operate their business effectively,” he said.

“Our research shows that five in ten businesses in London were turned down for a loan or overdraft in the first quarter of 2013.

“This needs to be addressed as a matter of urgency which is why it is vital that the scheme announced today is attached to the soon to be created Business Bank which will house a myriad of similar funds.”

A further £15m is being made available for companies and research institutions in the science and technology sector who must apply for funding.

It has also emerged the mayor plans to spend £25m on widening the Western Anglia rail route, saying this will help the economy of east London by improving transport links.

Mr Johnson said it was “coincidental” the West Anglia rail franchise is one of the two he wants to take over next year.

Skip to toolbar